Our Research

Polar ice is home to large communities of algae that thrive in the frigid Arctic environment, including microscopic bacteria, viruses, unicellular algae, diatoms, worms and crustaceans. These tiny organisms have a big impact on the marine ecosystem and the entire planet — including us.

Andy Juhl and Craig Aumack, marine biologists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are spending a month in Barrow, Alaska studying algae in and below sea ice, and how our warming climate may impact these important organisms. They’re investigating the factors that control the growth of algae inside of sea ice, how these algal communities are connected to other Arctic marine organisms and what happens to the organic matter that builds up inside sea ice.

Barrow, Alaska

Barrow is the northernmost point in Alaska and is situated where the Chukchi Sea meets the Beaufort Sea. Throughout the long winter, these waters are covered with a thick layer of ice. This ice is home to many different microscopic algae, which form the base of the polar food web.

During late winter and spring, large communities of these algae flourish, or bloom, inside and on the undersurface of Arctic sea ice. As the ice melts, algae are released into the nutrient rich waters, feeding plankton and higher trophic levels, including fish, whales and seals.

The Arctic is warming faster than any other place on the planet, shortening winter and causing pack ice to thin and break up earlier and earlier each year. How will these changes impact the Arctic marine food web? Answering this question and understanding how the ice algae respond to our warming climate will inform resource managers and policymakers, as well as local residents, of how the larger Arctic marine ecosystem may be impacted.

Here we’ll share stories from the ice about our research, the role sea ice algae play in Arctic ecosystems and how that’s changing, and what’s it’s like to live at the top of the planet. And, if we’re lucky, a few pictures of whales and polar bears.

This project is funded in part by the National Science Foundation and the Brinson Foundation. Views expressed here do not represent those of the funding agencies, nor Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory or Columbia University.

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